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 Post subject: Re: Capo for the Ric
 Post Posted: Fri Oct 14, 2011 5:22 pm 
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Ain'tGotNoPokemon wrote:
iiipopes wrote:
David..Uk1971 wrote:
He also used to sing, The bells of Rhymney, pronouncing it Rim-nee, when it's actually pronounced RUM-nee. He nows sings it correctly when someone from Rhymney emailed and told him that he had pronounced it wrong, for all those years!

That is because in American English, when the letter "y" is used as a vowel, it is conventionally pronounced as the vowel "i." So as with any word, including the discussion about pronouncing "capo," unless there is something to show a particular cultural or contextural pronunciation, a person not seeing the word before will try to pronounce it in a manner consistent with his/her background and language conventions.

You had me at American English. :ugeek: :idea: ;)

Indeed. UK & USA: two great countries separated by a "common language." (Or would that be, using single quotation marks for the British readers: two great countries separated by a 'common language', where it is proper to have the full stop or half stop [American: period or comma] outside the single quotation marks instead of inside double quotation marks, which is American usage?)


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 Post subject: Re: Capo for the Ric
 Post Posted: Fri Oct 14, 2011 5:56 pm 
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iiipopes wrote:
That is because in American English, when the letter "y" is used as a vowel, it is conventionally pronounced as the vowel "i." So as with any word, including the discussion about pronouncing "capo," unless there is something to show a particular cultural or contextural pronunciation, a person not seeing the word before will try to pronounce it in a manner consistent with his/her background and language conventions.

You had me at American English. :ugeek: :idea: ;)[/quote]
Indeed. UK & USA: two great countries separated by a "common language." (Or would that be, using single quotation marks for the British readers: two great countries separated by a 'common language', where it is proper to have the full stop or half stop [American: period or comma] outside the single quotation marks instead of inside double quotation marks, which is American usage?)[/quote]
There are many things that set American English apart from British English, and a lot of it comes from our early history. It was intentionally decided that we would pronounce or spell things differently just to stick it to the man. Early America is full of that. :lol:

So, the next time a Brit tells you you're not speaking proper English... :twisted:


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 Post subject: Re: Capo for the Ric
 Post Posted: Fri Oct 14, 2011 6:54 pm 
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Location: Australia
When I visited Londinium last, we spoke latin so I asked for a capotasto!
Seems like the world changes so fast these days, I just cannot keep up :lol:

So what's the all beef? Look what happened to my Lauguage!!!!!!!

Signed in blood by Dracula


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 Post subject: Re: Capo for the Ric
 Post Posted: Sat Oct 15, 2011 10:17 am 
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Ain'tGotNoPokemon wrote:
There are many things that set American English apart from British English, and a lot of it comes from our early history. It was intentionally decided that we would pronounce or spell things differently just to stick it to the man. Early America is full of that. :lol:

So, the next time a Brit tells you you're not speaking proper English... :twisted:

Yes, Benjamin Franklin was a major exponent of "rationalizing" the language and simplifying spelling on this side of the pond.

The puctuation issues come from the technology of antique hand-set type, and as the British form shows, along with the advent of digital forms of communication, the trend is towards rationalizing, or is that rationalising, the language for clarity of expression.


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 Post subject: Re: Capo for the Ric
 Post Posted: Sat Oct 15, 2011 11:53 am 
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Location: Wales...Uk
Well if I can complicate things further..........The place of Rhymney isn't even an English language word.
In Wales, Englands lesser known next door neighbour, ( pop: 2million ) 20% of people speak the native language of Welsh. All street signs are in Welsh as well as English and most of the town names here are Welsh and those that are English have a Welsh equivalent....i.e Cardiff - Caerdydd.. ( pronounced Cayer-deeth )
I myself come from a Valley called the Rhondda which is also mentioned in the Byrds song.....( pronounced Rontha )....
The English can't even pronounce Welsh names so I wouldn't expect an American to know them. ;)
JBud, if you're worried about fitting into a place and not upsetting the locals, then don't ever call a Welshman-English!!!!!!! ... Not advisable at all! ;)

Ffarwelio a dymuniadau gorau....(goodbye and best wishes)...In Welsh


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 Post subject: Re: Capo for the Ric
 Post Posted: Sat Oct 15, 2011 4:07 pm 
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As an American, I have never heard capo pronounced any other way than "kay-po." If it were spelled with two "P"s I would expect it to be pronounced "cap-po."

I believe the McGuinn knew the correct pronunciation of Rhymney. As a very knowledgable folkie in the music scene, he certainly would have heard the original version of the song as sung by its composer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gP5gIDrNlrY

The original, like most folk music, sort of plods along with emphasis on the story. McGuinn's R&R version is much to slick to have a clunky sounding syllable in there, sort of like a pot hole in a fast road. The way McGuinn chose to sing it fits in with his voice and the Byrds' sound. I imagine Pete probably understood this, and did not call him on it. And back in the 60s, McGuinn probably never imagined getting corrected via the World Wide Web. The Byrds' sound favored smooth-flowing sonic harmony, and "rim-ney" has a lot more smoooth jingle-jangle harmony that "rum-ney." After all, which Byrd sang the song? Why, "Jim McGuinn," of course. (You heard of him, right? :) )


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 Post subject: Re: Capo for the Ric
 Post Posted: Sat Oct 15, 2011 7:49 pm 
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To throw another spanner in the works! Probably saying cap'o is more true to it's origin Capotasto, so now we will have to asks someone who is from Spain or Italy, to chip in! However I cannot imagine it was called CA'Y'POTASTO can you? However I maybe wrong


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 Post subject: Re: Capo for the Ric
 Post Posted: Sat Oct 15, 2011 11:47 pm 
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jbudweiser wrote:
To throw another spanner in the works! Probably saying cap'o is more true to it's origin Capotasto, so now we will have to asks someone who is from Spain or Italy, to chip in! However I cannot imagine it was called CA'Y'POTASTO can you? However I maybe wrong


This thread is so amusing! (and informative, of course)
Guess my surprise when I read JBud's call to the spanish speaking guys...lol

ok, so being a native spanish speaking guy, here goes the bomb: it is called Capotraste

kah-poh-tras-teh

Which of course, refers to "capo" or first and "traste" or fret : first fret

see?


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 Post subject: Re: Capo for the Ric
 Post Posted: Sun Oct 16, 2011 5:56 am 
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Anothersixstringer. Thanks for that input, perfect timing, I've heard you play you have great timing there too. Spain carries a grand tradition of guitar and guitar playing. The use of the Capo is long entrenched in Spanish guitar tradition, it probably reached the rest of the world long after!

We all owe the Spanish a lot ! You guy's sure know how to play. Flamenco at it's best is mind blowing, and impossible to play. One style I really like is that of the Grenada region high in the mountains, the guitar playing mimics this as the chords they use are open like fresh air and they are high open chords like the mountains themselves. I was lucky I once had a Spanish guitar teacher. I use such chords but not the same finger style. I reckon flamenco chords are the tastiest. Adam del Monte is a great flamenco guitarist, he's a complete player and creative as well as technical. Stringed instrument have some origins in Persia, but the guitar that belongs to Spain!

Thanks for your input in this funny post, it's traveled a fair way around the globe before you provided it's origin. How's the hunt for a 12 string going?


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 Post subject: Re: Capo for the Ric
 Post Posted: Tue Nov 01, 2011 5:33 am 
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Posts: 127
Location: UK
BlueRick wrote:
In the U.S., a cap-o is a mob enforcer/mob lieutenant. ;)


They are the same word - meaning "head".

And the G7 is by far the best capo available. Yes, the Kyser and indeed the Shubb are good capos but if you've used a G7 you know what I mean.


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