Board index » Rick restoration from part to finish




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 103 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 7, 8, 9, 10, 11  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: 360 Casualty
 Post Posted: Sat Jan 09, 2010 10:14 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Aug 30, 2009 4:06 pm
Posts: 32
Location: London, UK
Blue Angel, it makes perfect sense... Like making a bow and arrow... you pull the string while holding the end of the bow and as you pull the string tighter - the bow bends more as that is the only direction it can go in. Thus it makes no difference that one is shorter than the other as it has no bearing on what it does. Well, here are the pics so far - the hide glue works an absolute dream (sheesh!! It f*&@ing stinks!!).
I glued the neck fracture yesterday and it has done such a fantastic job on that. What should I use as filler? On the neck break there is a little piece of wood missing from the end - a tiny piece but it causes a definite pit in the finish - as for the gap between the neck, do you think I should fill that as it might make it harder to remove the neck if necessary again?

http://s93.photobucket.com/albums/l49/Androol_2006/



Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: 360 Casualty
 Post Posted: Sat Jan 09, 2010 11:54 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Feb 18, 2008 9:10 am
Posts: 618
Location: CT
Quote:
Well, here are the pics so far - the hide glue works an absolute dream (sheesh!! It f*&@ing stinks!!).
I glued the neck fracture yesterday and it has done such a fantastic job on that. What should I use as filler? On the neck break there is a little piece of wood missing from the end - a tiny piece but it causes a definite pit in the finish - as for the gap between the neck, do you think I should fill that as it might make it harder to remove the neck if necessary again?

http://s93.photobucket.com/albums/l49/Androol_2006/



The hide glue is made from dead animals, so I hope your not a vegetarian. Their is a perfumed version that is used to glue the liner in guitar cases. I would fill the gaps around the neck and the pit with a suitable wood filler. (Ric fills in the gap around the neck also). BA might have some brand names for you. It looks like you're doing a great job!


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: 360 Casualty
 Post Posted: Mon Feb 15, 2010 2:06 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Aug 30, 2009 4:06 pm
Posts: 32
Location: London, UK
OKAY!!!

Check it out! I have finished - although I have not polished the finished as I thought I would give it a month or two to let the shellac harden properly. I am as proud ad punch and she is the most gorgeous colour!! You might notice that the neck pick up is slightly off-centre but I will try and right that in the next few days - (just wanted to play it!!) but she sounds beautiful and the action is completely different from before - now the bridge is really high when before it was almost flush with the body - a good indication of how much of an angle the neck was at!! My one concern is that I have set the neck slightly angled to the left (if you are looking at the guitar lying flat on the ground on its back) as it comes out the body - it's so slight that I'm not sure whether I'm imagining things or not.... does it matter if I have - although it would be a mission to steam the neck again when I have just finished it, I'm prepared to do it again - however at this point it seems to play/sound fine...

I am going to write in my finest delicate marker on the wood inside the body (under the perspex) that this was the work of Schoolside and Blue Angel - without you guys this would never have happened!!! In fact I will put it in our album notes...
(feel free if it's rubbish to ask to have your name removed!!!)


Thanks Dudes - me and The Rick are eternally grateful.



http://s93.photobucket.com/albums/l49/A ... %20Cracks/


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: 360 Casualty
 Post Posted: Mon Feb 15, 2010 2:49 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Nov 16, 2005 2:00 pm
Posts: 2962
Location: Scotland
I think you've done an excellent job - I still stand behind everything I said earlier about the danger of 'having a go' if you're not experienced at this sort of work, but you've proved that if you do take the time to learn how to do it, and aren't bothered about a 'factory' restoration, then you can get a good result. It's really *your* guitar now too, in a way it wouldn't have been if you'd paid a professional to do it. I don't mind at all if you want to write whatever you like under there - even if it's to say you proved me wrong! :-)

I wouldn't worry too much if the neck appears to be a little off line sideways as long as the joint is tight and strong, and it's correct front-to-back - it may well be fine, the bridges and tailpieces sometimes don't line up quite perfectly on a lot of guitars, and it may be that which is making you think the neck is out of line. If anything, looking at the pics sighting down from the tailpiece to the neck, it looks like it's only the bridge which may be slightly out. You could fix this easily by filling and redrilling the two screw holes - probably when you do the final polish.

I've actually had to re-site both bridges and pickups on several Ricks, as well as many other other guitars...


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: 360 Casualty
 Post Posted: Mon Feb 15, 2010 9:47 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Feb 18, 2008 9:10 am
Posts: 618
Location: CT
Hi FFR,
I've been waiting and wondering how it was going.
The guitar looks FABULOUS!!! You did a terrific job and I couldn't be more proud of you! I would suggest you play it in awhile before moving anything, if you find the neck is holding good and tight then you might want to re-align the pickups and bridge to get it all 100% straight. Once again, Great Job! This has got to be your favorite guitar in the whole world.

ps: True confession time, the thanks goes to BA for all his technical support. I didn't know a darn thing about it other than to give you a little encouragement. You made my day, Thanks.


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: 360 Casualty
 Post Posted: Mon Mar 01, 2010 5:32 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Aug 07, 2005 1:00 pm
Posts: 1416
Location: SF CA
Agreed. Nice work, FFR!!!

_________________
Rickenbackers: I love to play them. I enjoy the challenge of working on them. I love the way they sound.


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: 360 Casualty
 Post Posted: Sat Nov 06, 2010 4:09 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Aug 30, 2009 4:06 pm
Posts: 32
Location: London, UK
Once again, I really want to thank everyone who helped me to restore my guitar. I am humbled by your kindness and generosity of spirit. My guitar sounds absolutely beautiful (I just had some final touch done - the bridge has now been realigned and the frets filed a little by someone who really knows what they're doing!!) - I am as proud as punch and hope our band does the name justice - She once again is singing that soulful blues Rickenbacker sound that sings to me like Louis Armstrong's trumpet.

(Mega Chuffed!!)


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: 360 Casualty
 Post Posted: Sat Nov 06, 2010 3:57 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Aug 02, 2009 12:54 am
Posts: 405
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark
Just a few words about glue.

First of all hot hide glue does NOT work by penetrating the wood fibers as for instance yellow glue. Hide glue is working in a complicated electro-chemical proces that bonds with the surfaces molecylar structures - not the fibres. That's why tone wood is not muted too much when using hide glue. One of many secrets about old Italian violins. The electro-chemical reaction btw is the reason that fresh hide glue works very well on old hide glue.

The problem with hide glue is using it. It's very difficult. If something goes wrong with the temperature in the glue line during operation - it doesn't work. You must be quite skilled to use it.

The other thing to say about glue - and the idea that it's stronger than the wood it bonds together is, that all types of glue lose strength significantly over years. Urea formaldehyde glue for instance as used in many old Gibsons lose more than two thirds of its initial strength in 40 years (it's very well known from testing glue joints cut out of very old wooden gliders and other plywood aircrafts suchs as for instance the British Lancasters that served during WWII) - take a look here: http://scalesoaring.co.uk/Articles/Arti ... ageing.htm .

The first 10 to 15 % of the initial strength of many glues are gone within the first 10 years (the good thing is that all that initial strength is far from necessecary in a guitar throughout its life...) but almost all glues end up being significantly weaker than the wood surfaces they bond - even they were not from the beginning. The wood on the other hand may become stronger - such as poplar (used as lining in many master violins from Cremona) which sort of petrify and may become VERY strong.

But still - hide glue is a little different - if kept under the right conditions. Furnitures being 5000 years old found in sealed rooms in the Cheops in Egypt had glue joints performed with hide glue all those years ago still as fresh and strong as the day they were made (probably...). Dry air and a the right temperature is the way to go with hide glue.

End of Glue Lesson 1 :o)

PS I would personally have build up the sides in the neck pocket to a tight+ fit before any gluing. One of the reason for that is that the string pull otherwise depends on the glued on back of the guitar - which have a huge crack along the side of the neck pocket (even it's glued) ... I don't think the neck is reglued the correct way.


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: 360 Casualty
 Post Posted: Sun Nov 07, 2010 12:19 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Feb 18, 2008 9:10 am
Posts: 618
Location: CT
Quote:
... I don't think the neck is reglued the correct way.


I haven't post here for a while but I'm glad to see FFR is enjoying his guitar. Schmidt, thanks for the glue lesson but I think we'll let time decide how the neck holds up.

The best part is FFR can rebuild this himself should anything go wrong. Not many people here have successfully reset the neck of their Ricky on the kitchen table so my hat is off to him!



Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: 360 Casualty
 Post Posted: Sun Nov 07, 2010 10:17 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Aug 02, 2009 12:54 am
Posts: 405
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark
Quote:
Quote:
... I don't think the neck is reglued the correct way.


...Schmidt, thanks for the glue lesson but I think we'll let time decide how the neck holds up....



Yes only time will show... sometimes very short time unfortunately :o)


Top 
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
 
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 103 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 7, 8, 9, 10, 11  Next

Board index » Rick restoration from part to finish


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

 
 

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  

Register    Login    Forum    Search    FAQ
X