Board index » Rick restoration from part to finish




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 23 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: RESTORING A RICKENBACKER?
 Post Posted: Wed Nov 03, 2010 3:58 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Aug 07, 2005 1:00 pm
Posts: 1416
Location: SF CA
Are you restoring a Rickenbacker? Do you have a digital camera and a desire to show the rest of us what you're up to?

Don't hide your projects--post here! We'd enjoy seeing your work and commenting on it. We're always around to give suggestions and helpful tips.

Please post. I've always got lots to show, but nobody wants to only see stuff from one guy--so c'mon!

_________________
Rickenbackers: I love to play them. I enjoy the challenge of working on them. I love the way they sound.


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: RESTORING A RICKENBACKER?
 Post Posted: Wed Nov 03, 2010 9:01 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2008 3:58 am
Posts: 1316
Location: En Zed
Ooh, great idea!

I'm gonna give it a go here in another 6 months or so (just got moved in and the shop is still full to the brim with boxes, etc., no room to work yet).

But, when I've got some space, I'm going to refinish my '76 4001 Azureglo to it's former factory fresh beauty... Unless it just happens to have some gorgeous figured maple under that paint...


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: RESTORING A RICKENBACKER?
 Post Posted: Wed Nov 03, 2010 9:31 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Nov 13, 2006 1:23 pm
Posts: 251
Location: Tulsa, Okalhoma
Gosh I have re-worked a couple of Ricks a number of years ago when you could get a smashed up instrument for $200-350,and wish I had another messed up one to do. These can be very rewarding winter projects when there's no time constraint. Unfortunately, at today's prices, a damaged Rick as a causal project is not really feasible anymore.

Even a Rick that has been run over by a train,washed away in a flood, and finally burned in a house fire seems to go for about $500 on e-bay. Add the fact that something like a used standard Hi-gain pickup that was going for $40 not so long ago now seems to command $120, and these become expensive projects for the amateur. Ah well, back to refinishing that Epiphone (sigh)v .....


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: RESTORING A RICKENBACKER?
 Post Posted: Wed Nov 03, 2010 10:04 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 05, 2007 12:33 am
Posts: 3403
Location: Denver
Well, here's what I'm up to. Converting my 1976 4001FL to a 3-pickup bass. Gotta install the Toasters soon... The neck pickup rout is 1/2'' spaced now. I got it in less than perfect condition--neck was solid and played fine which was the main thing for me--so I haven't been too worried about modding it.

http://i26.photobucket.com/albums/c130/ ... G_3092.jpg

Wiring harness (VVVT, preserves Ric-O-Sound but I'm losing the Switchcraft switch... in Ric-O-Sound the master tone only works for the neck and mid pickups):

http://i26.photobucket.com/albums/c130/ ... Wiring.jpg

Any advice is certainly welcome.


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: RESTORING A RICKENBACKER?
 Post Posted: Wed Nov 03, 2010 2:22 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 05, 2007 12:33 am
Posts: 3403
Location: Denver
Here's the finished product:

http://i26.photobucket.com/albums/c130/ ... 4001FL.jpg

Man, the pickups all sound great, I'm especially digging the neck+mid blend. Of course nothing is ever perfect and when I put everything back together something went awry with the jacks--the bridge pickup is somehow not making it over to the mono jack but I know it works through the Ric-O-Sound jack, so I'll have to address that soon. I also need to make a new pickguard because I am not using the hole for the Switchcraft switch.

Does anyone have detailed information about how to make a pickguard? I definitely need help. This one was made by Pickguardian.


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: RESTORING A RICKENBACKER?
 Post Posted: Wed Nov 03, 2010 9:17 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 08, 2006 6:07 am
Posts: 3710
Every time I've had to have a custom pickguard made, I had it made for me. It takes a very light touch with a router with the appropriate bits, and the guys who have the larger router tables that can steady the piece with a template are the guys to do it.

Don't worry about the hole for the selector switch. Let me see if I can find a grommet plug from another project to send you. I had the same thing on a project years ago, and I just put the little nickel plug in it that looks like an oversized snap top and everything was fine.


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: RESTORING A RICKENBACKER?
 Post Posted: Wed Nov 03, 2010 10:20 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 05, 2007 12:33 am
Posts: 3403
Location: Denver
Quote:
Don't worry about the hole for the selector switch. Let me see if I can find a grommet plug from another project to send you. I had the same thing on a project years ago, and I just put the little nickel plug in it that looks like an oversized snap top and everything was fine.


Good idea!


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: RESTORING A RICKENBACKER?
 Post Posted: Thu Nov 04, 2010 1:34 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Aug 07, 2005 1:00 pm
Posts: 1416
Location: SF CA
Here's some tips on guards:

1. A router table is what you need to accurately make these. For those who don't know, this places the router upside-down with the bit facing up, in a tabletop, so that the router is steady and immovable, and the piece is moved past the bit instead.

The table can cost as little as $30.00. You can make your own by boring a 1" diameter hole in either a piece of plywood or MDF, or an old tabletop. Use a flush-cutting bit with a ball-bearing pilot. Double-face your rough-cut acrylic to an MDF pattern (I've accumulated a library of about 60 of these in the last 6 years!). I rough-cut on a bandsaw to within about 1/8" of the edge before I tape the acrylic and pattern together.

This is also a good way to round off the top edges of older 1960s Rick guards, though those were originally scraped in a somewhat random fashion.

2. To replicate older white Rick guards (the semi-translucent ones), use a translucent white acrylic, and paint the back side with white lacquer (can be rattle-can or through a spray gun). Don't use enamel. This will give it the depth of the old guards without being able to see completely through. Wiring doesn't show this way.

3. To drill larger holes in the acrylic guards (and pots typically take 3/8", while pickup selector switches take 1/2" holes)forst drill a 1/8" pilot hole with an ordinary sharp twist drill bit.

Then use a step-type sheet metal drill to enlarge the 1/8" hole to the appropriate diameter.

Photobucket

This is a single-flute bit that won't grab the acrylic like a twist drill will. It scrapes its way through the acrylic in 1/16" increments, and leaves a clean, flash-free hole. What's more, you can actually use a hand drill to make the holes with one of these--no need to use a drill press or pillar drill.

_________________
Rickenbackers: I love to play them. I enjoy the challenge of working on them. I love the way they sound.


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: RESTORING A RICKENBACKER?
 Post Posted: Sun Nov 07, 2010 5:47 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 05, 2007 12:33 am
Posts: 3403
Location: Denver
Quote:
http://i26.photobucket.com/albums/c130/cassius987/4001-3PickupWiring.jpg


I thought the tone control in this setup would function as a master in mono, however it only affects the neck pickup. This seems odd to me--in mono on my 4003, both tone controls act as master if blend is on. Which tells me high frequencies from any pickups meeting up at the mono jack see this path of least resistance and take it--i.e. the neck pickup tone cuts highs from both pickups in blend, and vice-versa... Why wouldn't my wiring produce a master tone?

Maybe I need to run the capacitor from the mono jack. This would mean no tone control in Ric-O-Sound but that doesn't bug me.


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: RESTORING A RICKENBACKER?
 Post Posted: Tue Dec 07, 2010 4:13 am 
Offline

Joined: Fri Dec 03, 2010 5:38 am
Posts: 9
Location: UK
It's not really a restoration, as in as much as I am not stripping and refinishing, but is there a place for a 'beer-budget' refurbishment job in this thread?

My faithful 330/6 is looking tired and battered after 22 years. There are chips, dents and even a chunk that goes down to the maple out of the finish, the neck is out of whack after years of messing with light top / heavy bottom strings, the headstock is scarred and there is cracking all over the body. It's in a pretty sorry state tbf .Still makes me feel like a king when I play it though.

So, I've read the advice in here and dived in to try and do the best I can with limited resources.

I have pictures aplenty of the process so far


Top 
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
 
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 23 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3  Next

Board index » Rick restoration from part to finish


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests

 
 

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  

Register    Login    Forum    Search    FAQ
X