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 Post subject: 4001 restoration question
 Post Posted: Thu Feb 24, 2011 10:04 am 
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Joined: Thu Feb 24, 2011 9:28 am
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Hi,

I dont know if I posted this in the right section but if I didn't, im sorry in advance!

Anyways, I have a friend who has a 4001 Rickenbacker that he just got recently (he's new to the instrument world, as am I) and he was wondering if it has damage to it, is it possible to fix it? (like some paint chipped off, scratches, etc). And he was wondering if it is possible to change the paint color of it to any color he wants.

Thank you in advance.


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 Post subject: Re: 4001 restoration question
 Post Posted: Thu Feb 24, 2011 10:39 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jan 16, 2007 4:38 pm
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Location: Sydney, Australia
Nem wrote:
Hi,

I dont know if I posted this in the right section but if I didn't, im sorry in advance!

Anyways, I have a friend who has a 4001 Rickenbacker that he just got recently (he's new to the instrument world, as am I) and he was wondering if it has damage to it, is it possible to fix it? (like some paint chipped off, scratches, etc).

Finish chips and wood dents can be repaired, but colour matching requires a lot of patience - and in the case of a transition finish like fireglo it may be really tough.

Nem wrote:
And he was wondering if it is possible to change the paint color of it to any color he wants.

It's his bass, he can paint it flamingo pink if he wants, but in order to retain value I'd suggest getting a professional job done.

_________________
As I get older, my music gets softer and my shirts get louder....


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 Post subject: Re: 4001 restoration question
 Post Posted: Fri Feb 25, 2011 7:42 pm 
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Unless there is so much finish gone that there are issues of bare wood wearing or getting damaged from perspiration or other severe issues, for value he'd be better off letting it alone, possibly having a good luthier touch up the places that have gone to bare wood to prevent any deterioration, clean it up, have a good set up done, get a good set of strings, and just play it and enjoy it in it's "patina" condition.

Remember -- Fender is now charging about double the price of a new Am Std P-bass for one that has been given the "road worn" look on purpose by the custom shop -- go figure! :o


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 Post subject: Re: 4001 restoration question
 Post Posted: Sat Feb 26, 2011 10:41 am 
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Joined: Tue Jan 05, 2010 2:32 am
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Location: Orange, CA
And what's so funny about those "road worn" instruments is that all they really do with them is tie a rope around the neck, then take it to the parking lot and swing it around a bit, letting it graze off the ground. They then put it in a sealed chamber and light a pack of cigarettes to give it the many-nights-in-a-bar smell/slight yellowish glaze on the finish.

Anyway, veering back on topic now...


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 Post subject: Re: 4001 restoration question
 Post Posted: Tue Mar 01, 2011 1:57 pm 
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Location: SF CA
iiipopes wrote:
Unless there is so much finish gone that there are issues of bare wood wearing or getting damaged from perspiration or other severe issues, for value he'd be better off letting it alone, possibly having a good luthier touch up the places that have gone to bare wood to prevent any deterioration, clean it up, have a good set up done, get a good set of strings, and just play it and enjoy it in it's "patina" condition.

Remember -- Fender is now charging about double the price of a new Am Std P-bass for one that has been given the "road worn" look on purpose by the custom shop -- go figure! :o



If I may differ in opinion from my good friend Scott...

If what your friend has there is a celebrity-owned or very rare bass (say, a '60s 4001), I would agree wholeheartedly with Scott's comments and recommendations.

What's more, if you and your friend are both newcomers to the amazing world of Rickenbacker instruments, and (as newcomers often are) short on knowledge and possibly on pocket cash as well, Scott's advice is quite sound.

However, if your Rickenbacker bass falls into the vast majority of instruments out there, being a working instrument with no definite provenance or claim to fame, and you choose to have a knowledgeable pro refinish or "restore" it , keeping its character in mind, you will not see any appreciable decrease in investment, provided you sell it to a knowledgeable enthusiast. In fact, it's not unusual for owners to be able to recover their investment, and one hopes, once the economy recovers, even see a slight profit if the project is carefully intentioned and managed.

In other words, a $1500 bass with a really nice $1500 restoration could bring $3000 in time. How much time depends on too many factors to list, but unless you really mess it up, you won't lose money in a fair deal.

And, if economics are less important than your desire to make it "new" or make it "yours", go ahead and get it done, and enjoy it for years to come. Ricks generally appreciate unless terribly abused or defaced.

_________________
Rickenbackers: I love to play them. I enjoy the challenge of working on them. I love the way they sound.


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