Board index » Rick restoration from part to finish




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 Post subject: Re: Spot-refinishing a mapleglo 72' 4001
 Post Posted: Thu Jul 27, 2006 11:52 am 
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Joined: Sun Aug 07, 2005 1:00 pm
Posts: 1416
Location: SF CA
This is a general statement, and in no way should be taken as a personal attack on your own luthier, BUT:

In my experience, many luthiers are primarily mechanics and tinkerers. They are less concerned with the aesthetics of a guitar than with how it plays and sounds. To say they would have a lack of empathy with how a finish goes on and how it reacts with other materials and surfaces, would be generous.

To these guys, finishing is a necessary evil. It is the second-last step in getting a patch job done. Many will rush through it. Many don't retain any sort of controlled finishing environment--just a spray gun hooked up to a compressor in ther middle of the shop, which gets cleaned occasionally. Nitro is good in this sort of environment; any doofus can learn to spray it in an hour or two, it dries very quickly, too, so the dust in most luthiers' shops will cause a minimum of damage.

Then you get to something very specific and unique--the finishing process on a Rickenbacker guitar or bass. It is a process that for a luthier or finisher takes research, study, deduction, and practice, practice, practice. It's a combination of process, systematic attention to procedure and detail, and no small familiarity with the chemistry of paints and plastics, not to mention wood, celluloid, sandpaper, buffing technology, and so on. And the state of this art is in constant flux, too...

Why mess with this complex, "black magic" discipline, when many luthiers are lucky to see one Rick a year?

I once made the statement that there were probably less than a couple dozen people in the USA who were capable of properly refinishing a Rickenbacker instrument to factory standards. John Hall opined that the number was far less than that, and could probably be counted on one hand, in fact.

The discoloration on your bass is probably reversible, so use it until you can't stand to look at it anymore, then send it to one of us West Coasters.

No hurry--we're plenty busy in the meantime, luthiering, restoring, rewiring, painting, buffing, assembling.

And we are learning all the time how to do it better, too.


_________________
Rickenbackers: I love to play them. I enjoy the challenge of working on them. I love the way they sound.


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 Post subject: Re: Spot-refinishing a mapleglo 72' 4001
 Post Posted: Thu Jul 27, 2006 5:57 pm 
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Joined: Sat Sep 24, 2005 1:00 pm
Posts: 16
Location: Halifax, N.S. Canada
After a night of sleep I am still pretty angry, but calming down. When I get the bass back I will reasess how angry I am.

I see it as surgery. Your GP can probably do an ok job... and they love the opportunity. But if you want it done right go to a surgeon... more specifically a rickenbacker surgeon.

You get what you pay for... too bad I had to learn this the hard way... and with my 72'



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 Post subject: Re: Spot-refinishing a mapleglo 72' 4001
 Post Posted: Tue Aug 22, 2006 10:24 pm 
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Joined: Tue Aug 09, 2005 1:00 pm
Posts: 231
Location: Halifax Nova Scotia
Who did you give it to , John ? On the positive side nothing was done to effect the sound or playability of your instrument.


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