Board index » Rick restoration from part to finish




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 Post subject: Re: Cost of a proper Maple-Glo refinish
 Post Posted: Sun Jan 28, 2007 7:48 am 
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Joined: Tue Aug 09, 2005 1:00 pm
Posts: 1848
Location: New York, NY
I like the irony of guitars made out of Hard Rock so often being used to play Pop Rock.


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 Post subject: Re: Cost of a proper Maple-Glo refinish
 Post Posted: Mon Jan 29, 2007 5:00 am 
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Joined: Sun Aug 07, 2005 1:00 pm
Posts: 1416
Location: SF CA
I have refinished a good number of factory JGs in other finishes, and have not found anything really bad underneath yet. Melibee's formerly-JG 481, refinished in a transparent Cobalt burst, had two inclusions, but they look just gorgeous under the tint--just one more indication that this instrument was once a living tree!

I can, however, see that a large flaw would not be good under a transparent or translucent finish...

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Rickenbackers: I love to play them. I enjoy the challenge of working on them. I love the way they sound.


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 Post subject: Re: Cost of a proper Maple-Glo refinish
 Post Posted: Wed Jan 31, 2007 12:28 am 
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Hey Dale,
Drop me a line when you get a chance re: my 330/12 project. I've sent you a bunch of emails and haven't heard back. I think I'm getting caught in your spam filter.

Dan


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 Post subject: Re: Cost of a proper Maple-Glo refinish
 Post Posted: Tue Feb 13, 2007 7:56 am 
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Joined: Thu Dec 28, 2006 12:05 am
Posts: 201
Location: Fullerton, CA
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Swold, you sound knowledgeable about these materials in an automotive setting. But you're off the mark where guitars are concerned.

It has to do with quantities. When I learned to spray-paint, everything was nitro and acrylic lacquer and enamels. Then a weird DuPont paint, Imron (often misspelled as "Emron", BTW) came on the market with tons of warnings.

I sprayed precision models for over 30 years, guitars for the same length, show cars for 12 years, before I did my first Rickenbacker.

In a downdraft booth, we never used any sort of protection except for a half-face respirator with purple cartridges.

Your caveats are definitely applicable in high-volume shops where the booth has little time to be cleared by air flow. Rick's guitars are sprayed in open-faced, back-draft booths. I've watched the air flow, and it is 99% away from the painter with virtually no backflow.

I work in a full-sized auto spray booth and have been doing so for a very long time. I wear a half-face mask. I've never had any health problems using this protection.

Note that the manufacturers of these coatings must cover their bases legally and address the worst case scenario when writing their cautionaries.

That having been said, let me restate that refinishing a Rickenbacker to factory standards is very specialized and labor-intensive and there is little commonality with an ordinary guitar refinish job such as is practiced by your local luthier.


>>> Check out this photo of a guitar being painted, and the reasons why it's done this way.


It's not an Intel guy, it's XXXX in the spray booth! You will notice he looks like he is outfitted for a trip into space. Well that's sort of true. He is entering a different kind of space where the air quality is not conducive to normal breathing activities, nor would the overspray do much for his clothing. Although OSHA requires only a respirator mask for this job function, we feel that you can't adequately get a good seal with one given the different contours of a face not to mention the possibility of mustaches and beards making a good seal impossible. We choose the space suit method with a fresh air line so he is always supplied with clean air and no part of his body or clothing is exposed. The suit has another added bonus, no small hairs or filaments of clothing can float into the wet finish.














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 Post subject: Re: Cost of a proper Maple-Glo refinish
 Post Posted: Tue Feb 13, 2007 12:47 pm 
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Location: Fullerton, CA
But of course, $15,000 guitars have little commonality with $1500 guitars. For that price it had better not. These guys have it right.


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 Post subject: Re: Cost of a proper Maple-Glo refinish
 Post Posted: Sat Feb 17, 2007 12:55 pm 
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Joined: Sat Sep 24, 2005 1:00 pm
Posts: 328
Location: West Hills, Ca.
I don'tknow about that, just because the market jacks up the price, doesn't mean the 15,000 dollar beast is any better of an instrument!

My example would be the Hofner bass. A 200-500 dollar bass at best, quality wise (IMHO), that can cost 1500-2000 in crappy condition!

Or those beat up fenders at GC! The crappier they look, the higher the price.

In conclusion, maybe we should beat the crap out of our Rics!


Nah!!


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 Post subject: Re: Cost of a proper Maple-Glo refinish
 Post Posted: Mon Feb 19, 2007 12:15 am 
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Joined: Thu Dec 28, 2006 12:05 am
Posts: 201
Location: Fullerton, CA
Quote:
I don'tknow about that, just because the market jacks up the price, doesn't mean the 15,000 dollar beast is any better of an instrument!

My example would be the Hofner bass. A 200-500 dollar bass at best, quality wise (IMHO), that can cost 1500-2000 in crappy condition!

Or those beat up fenders at GC! The crappier they look, the higher the price.

In conclusion, maybe we should beat the crap out of our Rics!


Nah!!


I'm talking about new instruments. Cadillacs are nice cars, but they're not Bentleys. A Yamaha piano is a nice instrument, but it's not a Bosendorfer. Capeesh?







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 Post subject: Re: Cost of a proper Maple-Glo refinish
 Post Posted: Wed Feb 21, 2007 12:22 am 
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Posts: 1416
Location: SF CA
Swold, if you knew me, you'd know that stray hairs are not a problem with my finishes...LOL.

An occasional speck of dust does get into the clearcoat. This is really irrelevant to Rickenbacker-type finishes (an many others, I night add) because these finishes are wet-flatted with rubber blocks to 2000 grit, and buffed to a glasslike shine.

_________________
Rickenbackers: I love to play them. I enjoy the challenge of working on them. I love the way they sound.


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 Post subject: Re: Cost of a proper Maple-Glo refinish
 Post Posted: Wed Feb 21, 2007 2:25 am 
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Joined: Thu Dec 28, 2006 12:05 am
Posts: 201
Location: Fullerton, CA
Quote:
Swold, if you knew me, you'd know that stray hairs are not a problem with my finishes...LOL.

An occasional speck of dust does get into the clearcoat. This is really irrelevant to Rickenbacker-type finishes (an many others, I night add) because these finishes are wet-flatted with rubber blocks to 2000 grit, and buffed to a glasslike shine.


>>> I'm sure you're quite good, as photos of your work would suggest. I was referring more to volume refinishing in a manufacturing environment where the paint booth is in near continuous operation and where biohazard exposure and finish contamination are not tolerated. FYIA, the manufacturer I cited is ALEMBIC. Have you ever done their factory tour? It's really amazing. They have tours the first Wednesday of every month at 11 AM, call a week ahead.
Old man Wickersham is a fascinating dude, and he'll talk your ear off. It would take most of us a hundred lifetimes to even scratch the surface of what that guy knows.


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