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 Post subject: Re: WHAT WOULD YOU LIKE TO KNOW MORE ABOUT?
 Post Posted: Thu May 15, 2008 6:49 pm 
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Joined: Wed May 03, 2006 4:42 am
Posts: 161
Location: Treasure Coast, FL
"So, if you've got an issue that's burning a hole in the back of your brain, oor are just curious why something is done like it is, this is a good area to air it."

Ok Paul.....I have a few questions, I'll try to keep it simple.

#1 I have a beautiful 1978 4001 Autumn Glo. The matte finish has started to look like it has been buffed to a shine in a small 3 or 4 inch area where my hand rubs on the finish. IS it possible restore that small polished area with the original MATTE finish without a complete refinish? Lastly, on this question, what do you suggest for cleaning a matte finish?

#2 I have a 1971 4001 BG that has a REALLY WORN 12th fret. It's so worn, the note doesn't even play when fretted. The binding is very worn on the side of the neck from use as well (you can actually see the tang on the fret). My local luthier said he can't replace the fret w/o the possibility of chipping the fingerboard (if he doesn't remove the binding) but if he DOES remove the binding, he doesn't think he can find the original binding to replace it. He also stated that I might as well do a complete REFRET while the binding is removed. DOES A REFRET CONSTITUTE A FINGERBOARD REFINISH as well? I'm also worried that IF this isn't done correctly, it will ruin the value of this 100% factory original. Do you feel a refret hurts the value of an otherwise original instrument?

Whew....:)
Thanks!


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 Post subject: Re: WHAT WOULD YOU LIKE TO KNOW MORE ABOUT?
 Post Posted: Fri May 16, 2008 7:44 am 
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Joined: Sun Aug 07, 2005 1:00 pm
Posts: 1416
Location: SF CA
Quote:
"So, if you've got an issue that's burning a hole in the back of your brain, oor are just curious why something is done like it is, this is a good area to air it."

Ok Paul.....I have a few questions, I'll try to keep it simple.

#1 I have a beautiful 1978 4001 Autumn Glo. The matte finish has started to look like it has been buffed to a shine in a small 3 or 4 inch area where my hand rubs on the finish. IS it possible restore that small polished area with the original MATTE finish without a complete refinish? Lastly, on this question, what do you suggest for cleaning a matte finish?


The wear to gloss of a matte surface comes from friction rubbing down the microscopic jagged peaks that scatted light and make the finish look matte in the first place. There are a few ways of dulling this, but they will all look inconsistent, and none will really be durable.

The only trustworthy method is to scuff the surface slightly (I use #P400 wet or dry sandpaper)and revarnish the bass with matte conversion varnish. I've done this a couple of times, and the instrument comes out looking quite fresh and ready for another 25 years of player wear. This method will also prevent the color from wearing off.


Quote:
#2 I have a 1971 4001 BG that has a REALLY WORN 12th fret. It's so worn, the note doesn't even play when fretted. The binding is very worn on the side of the neck from use as well (you can actually see the tang on the fret). My local luthier said he can't replace the fret w/o the possibility of chipping the fingerboard (if he doesn't remove the binding) but if he DOES remove the binding, he doesn't think he can find the original binding to replace it. He also stated that I might as well do a complete REFRET while the binding is removed. DOES A REFRET CONSTITUTE A FINGERBOARD REFINISH as well? I'm also worried that IF this isn't done correctly, it will ruin the value of this 100% factory original. Do you feel a refret hurts the value of an otherwise original instrument?


If you only wish to replace one or a few frets on a player-grade instrument, I see nothing wrong with doing just that and avoiding the hassle and delay of a complete refret and fretboard refinish.

Your luthier has a bad case of Rick-O-Phobia. The fret can be removed carefully with a pair of fret pliers, if the varnish is deeply knife-scored at the base of the fret on both sides. The fret should then be heated with a soldering iron to assist pulling it without chipping away the wood.

"Original binding" for a neck is nothing special--it's celluloid that year, and can be made by shaving down a piece of .060" thick by 3/16" celluloid binding, once it's been glued in place and allowed to dry at least overnight. The shaving is done on the bass guitar until it's flush with the neck on one exposed face and with the fretboard on the other. Marker dot holes are marked with an awl or machinist's scribe and drilled by hand with a #43 drill and a pin vise.

Marker dots are cut from a piece of 1/16" diameter celluloid rod (a 1/4" length is sufficient, fitted into the holes and glued and sanded flush once dry).

A refret is another story, and if you're interested in keeping your bass at least original in appearance, a revarnish of the board is a must, and it should not be done with nitro lacquer.

Your bass, although from a very desirable year, has seen a lot of playing. If it was a case queen, it would not need a refret, so I'd term it a player's bass, assuming the condition to be good to very good or it should not concern you. Judging from this, I would say, refret it properly to make it playable, and when you have it refretted and varnished, be as sure as you can be that it's done properly (NO jumbo frets!!!--Rick frets are actually small on these basses, being about .083" wide, not the .102" of jumbos.) and varnished with the correct materials. You'll have a player that has not lost any value.


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Rickenbackers: I love to play them. I enjoy the challenge of working on them. I love the way they sound.


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 Post subject: Re: WHAT WOULD YOU LIKE TO KNOW MORE ABOUT?
 Post Posted: Sun May 18, 2008 5:24 pm 
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Joined: Wed May 03, 2006 4:42 am
Posts: 161
Location: Treasure Coast, FL
Thanks for your informative response Paul,

I think when the time comes, I'll send the 71 to you for a complete refret. I just hate sending something like this through the mail.

The neck binding will have to be replaced, it actually appears to be worn thin. If the fingerboard has to be refinished, I'd rather you do it.

I guess the ATG will stay as is for now. One of these days I'll have it taken care of.

Thanks again for taking the time to respond.




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 Post subject: Re: WHAT WOULD YOU LIKE TO KNOW MORE ABOUT?
 Post Posted: Tue May 27, 2008 10:17 am 
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Joined: Sun Oct 08, 2006 6:07 am
Posts: 3817
Dale, please look for a private email from me requesting you work on the bridge to my 360-12WB FG ckbd.

Thanks.


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 Post subject: Re: WHAT WOULD YOU LIKE TO KNOW MORE ABOUT?
 Post Posted: Tue May 27, 2008 7:11 pm 
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Joined: Sun Mar 23, 2008 8:51 pm
Posts: 6
Location: Chicago, USA
I'm not sure if this question is allowed on this forum but I was wondering what would be the "ball park" price for restoration of a 1976 4001 bass? I'm just asking for a range, not an official quote. This is just so if I bring it to someone I'll know if the price is reasonable. If this question is more appropriate in a private email to one of the luthiers here, please let me know.

Thanks.
-SS


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 Post subject: Re: WHAT WOULD YOU LIKE TO KNOW MORE ABOUT?
 Post Posted: Tue May 27, 2008 9:28 pm 
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Location: SF CA
Surprisingly, ballparks on these do not vary much between the very few Rick luthiers/restorers around.

But this is an issue of Forum protocol--pricing and other matters related to business should be discussed off-forum.

You are welcome to write me at the email address in my profile.

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Rickenbackers: I love to play them. I enjoy the challenge of working on them. I love the way they sound.


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 Post subject: Re: WHAT WOULD YOU LIKE TO KNOW MORE ABOUT?
 Post Posted: Wed May 28, 2008 2:01 am 
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Location: Berlin, Germany
What's a Ballpark price?


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 Post subject: Re: WHAT WOULD YOU LIKE TO KNOW MORE ABOUT?
 Post Posted: Wed May 28, 2008 7:25 pm 
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Joined: Thu Mar 06, 2008 1:02 pm
Posts: 12
Location: Wagga Wagga NSW, Australia
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What would our members want to know, specifically, about Rickenbacker construction, restoration and finishing?
Paul,
I was wondering on the proceedure you would recommend to restore the finish on the fretboard/neck join as per these photos of my 1986 360/12. This will be after the fretboard is re-glued and the nut replaced. I would like to get rid of the chipped, rough line between nut and 1st fret.

http://www.users.bigpond.com/vrcollins/ ... rdGap1.jpg
http://www.users.bigpond.com/vrcollins/ ... rdJoin.jpg

Thanks, John Collins.


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 Post subject: Re: WHAT WOULD YOU LIKE TO KNOW MORE ABOUT?
 Post Posted: Wed May 28, 2008 9:05 pm 
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Joined: Sun Aug 07, 2005 1:00 pm
Posts: 1416
Location: SF CA
Quote:
Quote:
What would our members want to know, specifically, about Rickenbacker construction, restoration and finishing?
Paul,
I was wondering on the proceedure you would recommend to restore the finish on the fretboard/neck join as per these photos of my 1986 360/12. This will be after the fretboard is re-glued and the nut replaced. I would like to get rid of the chipped, rough line between nut and 1st fret.

http://www.users.bigpond.com/vrcollins/ ... rdGap1.jpg
http://www.users.bigpond.com/vrcollins/ ... rdJoin.jpg

Thanks, John Collins.


First of all, John, you've got the points on that Holden set way too close...should be about .018" as I recall...

Seriously, though, once it's firmly glued, you have two tasks--touching up the paint to match as closely as possible, and making the joint as nearly invisible as possible, where the surface is concerned.

First: the quickest way to touch up the color is with a similarly-colored nail varnish and a very small brush, filling in only the chipped areas. If the match of color is anywhere close, it will be virtually undetectable in such small areas.

Second: blending. You should also pick up a bottle of clear nail varnish. Dab this over the color you just applied, after it has dried thoroughly, and let it dry. After a few coats, you should be able to flatten it using #1000 wet or dry sandpaper. Once it's completely flat, you can bring the gloss back with a fine polishing compound.

Don't forget to wax the area when you're done.

_________________
Rickenbackers: I love to play them. I enjoy the challenge of working on them. I love the way they sound.


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 Post subject: Re: WHAT WOULD YOU LIKE TO KNOW MORE ABOUT?
 Post Posted: Thu May 29, 2008 4:05 am 
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Joined: Mon Aug 08, 2005 1:00 pm
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Location: NE Ohio
Quote:
What's a Ballpark price?

That means the same as an estimated range of cost.


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